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Thread: The Nephilim

  1. #1

    The Nephilim

    What do we really know. From all angles. Is there a compendium somewhere? Including the Nag Hamadi?

  2. #2

    Re: The Nephilim

    Quote Originally Posted by Tobias View Post
    What do we really know. From all angles. Is there a compendium somewhere? Including the Nag Hamadi?
    Angels - what if they were Just men? - at some times, with appointed powers?

    Angel in Greek Strong's Concordance


    3. Abaddon ab-ad-dohn' of Hebrew origin (11); a destroying angel:--Abaddon.
    32. aggelos ang'-el-os from aggello (probably derived from 71; compare 34) (to bring tidings); a messenger; especially an "angel"; by implication, a pastor:--angel, messenger. 743. archaggelos ar-khang'-el-os from 757 and 32; a chief angel:--archangel. 2465. isaggelos ee-sang'-el-los from 2470 and 32; like an angel, i.e. angelic:--equal unto the angels. 4151. pneuma pnyoo'-mah from 4154; a current of air, i.e. breath (blast) or a breeze; by analogy or figuratively, a spirit, i.e. (human) the rational soul, (by implication) vital principle, mental disposition, etc., or (superhuman) an angel, demon, or (divine) God, Christ's spirit, the Holy Spirit:--ghost, life, spirit(-ual, -ually), mind. Compare 5590.

    32. aggelos ang'-el-os from aggello (probably derived from 71; compare 34) (to bring tidings); a messenger; especially an "angel"; by implication, a pastor:--angel, messenger.

  3. #3

    Re: The Nephilim

    Quote Originally Posted by Tobias View Post
    What do we really know. From all angles. Is there a compendium somewhere? Including the Nag Hamadi?
    The Books of Enoch are very specific about the fallen.

    http://covenantpeoplesministry.org/f...crets-of-Enoch
    http://covenantpeoplesministry.org/f...-Walk-of-Faith
    http://covenantpeoplesministry.org/f...Angels-By-Name!
    http://covenantpeoplesministry.org/f...-Fallen-Angels

    Enoch even names many of these "watchers."

  4. #4

    Re: The Nephilim

    It is unclear what the Sons of God were, but they are distinguished from the daughters of men. The most obvious interpretation is that the Nephilim were a hybrid race between two distinct beings. There are at least three schools of thought regarding the Sons of God.

    The older view, held nearly unanimously by ancient writers prior to Augustine of Hippo, is that the Nephilim were a hybrid race between certain fallen angels, called the Benei Ha'Elohim ("Sons of God") or The Watchers in extra-Biblical traditions, and human women. While there has always been a minority of churchmen who followed this view, it has been promoted recently by popular writers such as Stephen Quayle.

    In The Genesis Record, Henry Morris states:

    “The only obvious and natural meaning without such clarification is that these beings were sons of God, rather than of men, because they had been created, not born. Such a description, of course, would apply only to Adam (Luke 3:38) and to the angels, whom God had directly created (Psalm 148:2, 5; Psalm 104:4; Colossians 1:16). The actual phrase bene elohim is used three other times, all in the very ancient book of Job (1:6; 2:1; 38:7). There is no doubt at all that, in these passages, the meaning applies exclusively to the angels. A very similar form (bar elohim) is used in Daniel 3:25, and also refers either to an angel or to a theophany. The term “sons of the mighty” (bene elim) is used in Psalm 29:1 and also Psalm 89:6, and again refers to angels. Thus, there seems no reasonable doubt that, in so far as the language itself is concerned, the intent of the writer was to convey the thought of angels - fallen angels, no doubt, since they were acting in opposition to God’s will.”

    The more recent view which has been the majority position in the church since St. Augustine in the fourth century is that the Sons of God refers to the god-fearing line of Seth; and the daughters of men refers to the daughters of the unbelieving line of Cain. Variations on this theme include the idea, proposed by Meredith Kline, that the Sons of God were kings or priests who took any woman they chose to be their wife.

    Still others (like single seedliners/OSL) hold that the Sons of God were other created men. It is argued that the Bible does not describe every person that was created, but only key individuals or situations are included within the text. Those holding to this position call into question the origin of Cain's wife or those whom he feared would kill him Genesis 4:14-17. However, this view falls into conflict with Genesis, which states that Eve is the mother of all the living.
    United Identity Church of Christ

    Now It's Your Choice! Will You take a Stand for God, Race, and Nation?

    http://www.scripturesforamerica.org/

  5. #5
    CPM's Gospel of LUKE
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  6. #6
    CPM's Gospel of LUKE
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    The Fallen Angels and the Heroes of Mythology, John Fleming


  7. #7

    Re: The Nephilim

    Quote Originally Posted by malachi83 View Post
    Angels - what if they were Just men? - at some times, with appointed powers?
    Unfortunately, the phrase "sons of God" appears in only five verses from only two books of the Old Testament. Two verses are found in the Genesis 6 flood account. The other three verses are found in the book of Job. From the book of Job, the context clearly indicates that "sons of God" are angelic beings, since they enter directly into God's presence or existed before the creation of the earth.

    In the New Testament "sons of God" always refer to redeemed human beings.

  8. #8

    Re: The Nephilim

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon View Post
    Unfortunately, the phrase "sons of God" appears in only five verses from only two books of the Old Testament. Two verses are found in the Genesis 6 flood account. The other three verses are found in the book of Job. From the book of Job, the context clearly indicates that "sons of God" are angelic beings, since they enter directly into God's presence or existed before the creation of the earth.

    In the New Testament "sons of God" always refer to redeemed human beings.
    In the Book of Job with the sons of God--how could satan present himself before God if he were not in Heaven?
    Why would satan in Job,be in the company of the sons of God?

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